Hummingbird Fest

Violet-crowned Woodnymph, Costa Rica, Central America

There are approximately 330 species of hummingbirds in the world, they’re found only in the Americas. One of the most remarkable birds on this planet, they are in the Trochilidae family.

 

Some hummingbirds migrate, some do not.

 

In northern California, my home, we have one resident species, the Anna’s Hummingbird, who stays all year long…even when there’s snow.

Anna’s Hummingbird, Northern California

 

Fortunately, we also have the divine pleasure of observing several of the migrating species passing through in spring and autumn. And in tropical countries, there are numerous species any time of the year.

 

They wear a kaleidoscope of colors, and some are especially dazzling. Many have prism-like cells in the top layer of feathers that, through pigmentation and refraction, give the effect of iridescence.

White-bellied Woodstar, Peru

 

Some also have punk hairdos and psychedelic markings, like this male tufted coquette.

Tufted Coquette, male, Asa Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad

 

Not all hummingbirds have the word “hummingbird” in their name. I guess after trying to name 330 different species, they ran out of words. By reading the names of each hummingbird in the photos here, you’ll see what I mean.

 

The booted racket-tail, below, is named for his racket-shaped tail and furry (orange) boots.

Booted racket-tail, Peru

 

Sparkling Violetear, Peru

 

Their unique flight skills out-perform all other birds. They move forwards, backwards, sideways, straight up, and are exquisite at hovering too.

Green Violetear Hummingbird, Costa Rica

 

Also, they have incredible speed. North American hummingbirds average about 53 wingbeats per second in normal flight.

Long-billed Hermit, Belize

 

They can dive at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour, and average about 20-45 miles per hour in normal flight. They are named for the humming sound created by their fast-beating wings.

Woodnymph in rainforest stream, Costa Rica

 

With special retinas, they can see as they zoom. A hummingbird’s tongue is also noteworthy.

 

If you have good eyesight, binoculars or camera lenses, sometimes you can actually see the tongue extended outside the bill. You may notice how long it is.

Anna’s hummingbird (male) — notice his tongue, California

 

Hummingbirds, and woodpeckers too, require long tongues to extract food. In the hummingbird’s case, they use their long, forked tongue to reach into tubular flowers for nectar.

Scaly-breasted Hummingbird, Belize

 

A recent discovery has revealed that both parts of the forked tongue hold tiny tubes. When the bird unfurls its tongue into the nectar vessel, the tubes open up, draw the nectar, and then lock shot, capturing the liquid for the hummingbird to ingest.

 

The hummingbird’s tongue is so long that it wraps around the inside of the skull.  They have a special bone, called the hyoid apparatus, that guides the tongue to reach over, behind, and under the eye.

Image result for tongue in skull hummingbird

Diagram courtesy of animalia-life.club

We once had a hummingbird nectar feeder that adhered by a suction cup to the window. By standing inside the building and looking out the window at the feeder, we could see the hummingbirds mere inches away. As the bird would drink sugar-water from the feeder, you could actually see the crown of the head pulsate where the tongue was operating.

 

There are more astonishing facts:  Wikipedia Hummingbird.

Male Snowcap Hummingbird, Costa Rica

 

They fly like a bullet, glitter like sequins, and dance in the flowers — an avian work of art.

 

Written by Jet Eliot.

Photos by Athena Alexander.

Chestnut-breasted Coronet pair, Peru

Ernst Haeckel’s Kunstformen der Natur (1899). Courtesy Wikipedia.

 

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135 thoughts on “Hummingbird Fest

  1. Wonderfully interesting post. When my daughter was young (5 or 6) we used to put a flower between her fingers and a hummingbird would come and feed on it. It was amazing. I love this description of yours:
    They fly like a bullet, glitter like sequins, and dance in the flowers — an avian work of art.:)

    • I so enjoyed your hummingbird story, Carol; and am really happy you enjoyed the hummingbird post. I am honored that a writer as accomplished as yourself found connection with my words. Many thanks.

  2. I’m always amazed our Anna’s stick around for the winter, and wonder how those tiny little critters survive freezing nights – especially considering how much energy it takes them just to fly. We’ll occasionally see Rufous hummers pass through, but I suspect they’re just migrating. I wish we had more variety – they’re neat birds.

    • Yes, that the Anna’s gut out the cold winters, as you say especially with that high metabolism rate, is amazing. They truly are delightful birds. Thanks so much, Dave, I enjoyed your comment.

    • Wonderful to know as you watch the exquisite Bahama Woodstars and Cuban Emeralds, RH, that you now know what’s happening inside their heads. My smiling thanks for your visit.

    • Hummingbirds are indeed awesome, Inese. I was hiking last week when I came up some steep trail stairs to find a hummingbird in my periphery, and he had an elf-like presence, I suppose because I hadn’t seem him at first. A fantastic surprise. I’m glad you enjoyed the hummingbirds, my friend, a pleasure to bring them to you.

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